History

May Day

May Day is an international holiday demonstrating the militant might, solidarity and unity of the working people of the whole world who are fighting against all kinds of domination and subordination and for independence.

On May 1, 1886, 136 years ago, a lot of workers staged a general strike and demonstration in Chicago of the United States against the harsh exploitation and oppression by the capital and in demand of the eight-hour working day system.

The news of their struggle spread to several places of the United States in an instant and hundreds of thousand workers went on strike on a nationwide scale. A lot of oppressed working people of the United States rose up against the exploitation and oppression by the capital and for the right to existence and the democratic freedom. Their struggle shook the world.

The inaugural congress of the Second International held in Paris of France in July 1889 decided to commemorate May 1 every year as an international holiday of the working people of the whole world in memory of the struggle of workers in Chicago of the United States who had bravely fought to take back the right to existence and sovereignty of the working class.

In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, May Day is celebrated every year amid the state concern.

May Day this year is a more significant holiday for the working people of Korea.

The inaugural ceremonies of Songhwa Street and the Potong Riverside Terraced Residential District were grandly held in the capital Pyongyang in April.

The respected Kim Jong Un was present at the inaugural ceremonies and warmly blessed the working people who have become the occupiers of the new street and houses.

The Korean working people are making redoubled efforts to bring a new era of happiness and civilization with the pride of firmly supporting their sovereignty with their hands in the grateful socialist system as the masters of the country.

Categories: History, Narrated

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